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The Tactic of Inflicting Christmas Misery

Whether it’s damaging beloved art or preventing ordinary, innocent, unrelated people from getting to work, the tactic of making people’s lives miserable for the purpose of forcing them to be aware of the cause of outrage has become “normalized,” the go-to tactic of the unduly passionate. You might be able to ignore their cries, but you can’t ignore their blocking a road. You might hate them for it, but they don’t care because they have seized control of your head by force. You might be furious, but to them, they own you and that, as far as they’re concerned, is good reason enough.

Does it matter what the cause is? Whether it’s Black Lives Matter or climate change or Gaza, the people suffering aren’t the perpetrators of whatever wrong is at hand, but ordinary folks who are going about their ordinary lives.

To those causing the harm, their cause is existential and worth whatever suffering they inflict. Indeed, it’s because ordinary people are going about their ordinary lives that they feel compelled to inflict harm, because these ordinary people aren’t committing their existence to the cause as the unduly passionate demand they do.

And it takes very few to inflict a great deal of misery. The will of the few for the misery of the many, but as long as the few believe they are in the right, they have no qualms about making the many suffer. It’s all for the cause, and the cause is good. Plus, it’s fun to protest and impose your will on others, especially if you can wrap in a pretty bow of righteousness.

But as bad as it is on any random Tuesday, they’ve now come for Christmas.

JUST IN: Pro-Palestinian Protesters block highway and entrance to Chicago O’Hare International Airport..pic.twitter.com/FOitOJtTMr

— Chuck Callesto (@ChuckCallesto) December 24, 2023

So what if you miss your flight? So what if you can’t get to see the parents, the children? How can you compare the trivialities of your life with the suffering of whatever the cause of the moment is?

The slogan, because they do love their slogans, is “No Christmas as usual” this year.

Pro-Palestinian protestors took to the streets on “Super Saturday” en masse, protesting on the day before Christmas Eve, which is often a time shoppers try to pick up last-minute gifts before the holidays.

The “Shut it Down for Palestine” movement, made up of pro-Palestinian groups, had plans to “organize actions to boycott, disrupt, and rally at commercial centers on Dec. 23,” according to the website of the ANSWER Coalition activist group.

It’s not that people who choose to spend their Christmas protesting aren’t allowed to do so, but that they are using this tactic to prevent others from doing whatever they choose. To the extent that they inflicted pointless misery on random unrelated people who had neither fault nor control over whatever grievance was at hand before, it’s now being cranked up a notch. No longer is it bad enough to stop someone from going to work, or picking up their child from daycare or getting to the hospital.

The tactic fell short. So just as 10 years didn’t end crime, surely 20 years will do the trick. Let’s ruin Christmas. How could they possibly ignore us now?

How does this end? Does it end? Can this generation weaned on imposing its righteous will on others be unbrainwashed to realize they aren’t the avenging angels of god, empowered to cause misery to the heretics? Even those who have had the epiphany of realizing that Jew hatred is very much an integral part of woke ideology fail to grasp that it’s an inherent flaw and not merely one outcome with which they disagree.

But the misery genie is out of the bottle and, despite the near universal criticism if not responsive outrage, they persist in their belief that it works, it’s righteous and it’s a lot of fun. They really don’t care how much misery they inflict on others. How long will others suffer this tactic before it devolves into a far worse infliction of misery, this time on the smug children who never believed they would end up being roadkill?

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